EdX Survey Finds That About 1

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. >Subscribe today!

More than twice as many principals in 2017 said students in their schools were assigned some type of mobile device, like a laptop or tablet, than in 2015. That’s according to the Speak Up Research Project for Digital Learning, which found that 60 percent of principals who responded to its latest survey say they assign these devices, compared with 27 percent two years earlier.

So what does that mean for classrooms? The Speak Up survey, a national initiative of Project Tomorrow, an education-focused nonprofit, also reached almost 341,000 students in 2017, and it found some distinct differences in what students with and without mobile devices said they did in school.

High schoolers assigned a laptop or a Chromebook were more likely to take notes in class, do internet research, create documents to share, collaborate with their peers on projects, check their grades and get reminders about tests or homework due dates. Among high school students assigned these devices, 60 percent said they had emailed their teachers with questions. That’s compared to 42 percent among students without an assigned device.

In focus groups, students explained that emailing their teachers was somewhat of an anxiety release, said Julie Evans, Speak Up’s CEO and the author of a brief about the findings.

“It isn’t as if they need the teacher to respond to them in that moment,” Evans said. “It’s more that they want to share the problem with someone.” And when they go to class the next day, they can arrive knowing their teacher is already aware of the problem.

Most high schoolers have a way to send an email from home, whether it’s from a smartphone or a family computer. But students with assigned devices from their schools are more likely to actually draft those emails and hit send.

Evans said sending those emails indicates students are independent learners who have the benefit of a school support system. She connected it to the portion of students who get electronic reminders about tests and homework due dates. Among high schoolers with assigned laptops or Chromebooks, 53 percent get those electronic reminders, compared with 39 percent of students who don’t have school-assigned devices, the survey found.

“The student can be responsible for their own learning and feel good about being responsible for their own learning,” Evans said. This can make students more confident in their own capabilities and perhaps create an environment where they are more willing to take educational risks, she said.

Schools that distribute mobile devices to students more often lay this foundation, the survey shows. They also give students chances to collaborate with their peers on projects. Nearly half of high schoolers with an assigned laptop or Chromebook say they get to do this, while just one-third of high schoolers without those assigned devices say the same.

In focus groups, students say they really like the idea of peer-to-peer learning, Evans said. Sometimes teachers can’t explain things in ways they understand. Their peers can fill in the gaps.

Schools that distribute mobile devices to all students seem to create opportunities for this type of work more than schools that don’t. It’s not that a 1:1 student-to-device ratio necessarily means more group work for students or better peer leadership. But technology can help facilitate these classroom experiences, Evans said.

Still, Evans, who has been asking about how technology is used for learning inside and outside of school through 15 years of Speak Up surveys, emphasizes that the technology is only a contributing factor.

“Just like anything else, it has to be supported well, and it has to be in the right hands and the teachers have to be really effective,” she said.

This story about digital learning devices was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. Sign up for the >Hechinger newsletter.

The Hechinger Report provides in-depth, fact-based, unbiased reporting on education that is free to all readers. But that doesn't mean it's free to produce. Our work keeps educators and the public informed about pressing issues at schools and on campuses throughout the country. We tell the whole story, even when the details are inconvenient. Help us keep doing that.

Join us today.

Source : https://hechingerreport.org/the-learning-experience-is-different-in-schools-that-assign-laptops-a-survey-finds/

The learning experience is different in schools that assign laptops, a survey finds
Survey finds 2M US teens are vaping marijuana
The Numbers Behind An Epidemic: More Than 2 Million Teens Have Used E-Cigarettes New Survey Finds
Survey Finds Today’s Children Are Spending 35% Less Time Playing Freely Outside
NYC, LI residents favor legalizing recreational marijuana, survey finds
'Homework Gap' Hits Minority, Impoverished Students Hardest, Survey Finds
A survey finds that more than 2 million U.S. teens are vaping marijuana
About 4.5 percent of adult Americans use e-cigs, and 15 percent of those never smoked traditional cigarettes, study finds
Thumbtack Survey Finds U.S. Small Business Owners Are More Likely to Be Registered and Vote Than General Population
Nobody Likes Banking Fees — but 1 in 6 Won’t Try to Avoid Them