Report Or No Report, South Carolina Confident It Can Compete For Boeing\'s 797

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The purpose of Next is to make it easier for new companies to start in the Greenville area. Moore pointed out that this "upstate" region of South Carolina had become famously effective in recruiting big, established firms to set up operations there: GE, BMW, Michelin, and on down a long list. "We've been so good an attracting other companies that we may not have done enough to develop our own," he said. Thus Next and related enterprises -- which connect startups with angel investors, provide physical space to get started, offer advice from mentors and startup veterans, and generally supply the sort of surrounding entrepreneurial information and advantage that can come automatically from being in startup centers from Boston to SF. 

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Some of the startups with offices in Greenville's Next building.

Has it made any difference? Can it make any difference, I asked Moore, given the scale and distance handicaps of a smallish place like Greenville?

I hope so," Moore told us. "We had eight software companies in our program in 2006. They hadn't known each other. Now we have 134 companies, all new, in all kinds of industries, from manufacturing to genomics to game software." He said that he expected 200 local startups to be involved with Next soon. The main building has space only for 20 to 24; the rest are part of a network for advice, financing, and other services. Moore said the companies Next is looking for are ones "that can compete on a global scale but are based here."" data-reactid="118">"If you'd asked me five years ago, during the toughest times economically, I would have said, I hope so," Moore told us. "We had eight software companies in our program in 2006. They hadn't known each other. Now we have 134 companies, all new, in all kinds of industries, from manufacturing to genomics to game software." He said that he expected 200 local startups to be involved with Next soon. The main building has space only for 20 to 24; the rest are part of a network for advice, financing, and other services. Moore said the companies Next is looking for are ones "that can compete on a global scale but are based here."

"They're now coming without recruiting. It's become a kind of flywheel. The momentum, the acceleration -- it all shows the potential. But of course I'm from the Chamber of Commerce, so you'd expect me to say that!"

Indeed, but then he put it in more tangible terms, gesturing to an office across the hall: "A few years ago, people like Eric Dodds would never have stayed here."

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Global Accelerator Networks." data-reactid="137">The Iron Yard's Eric Dodds, via Global Accelerator Networks.

Eric Dodds, whom we met at the Next building, is a co-founder and the chief marketing officer of The Iron Yard, a multi-purpose software startup based in Greenville and with operations in Spartanburg, nearby Asheville, NC, and other southeastern locations. You can read more about its operations here.

Dodds grew up in Greenville, and always dreamed of getting away. "Boulder, Portland -- that's where My People would be." Then, after going to Clemson and working for national branding companies, he came back and noticed that the place where he started out had changed. The Iron Yard's co-founder and CEO, Peter Barth, grew up in Florida and had worked in New York and the Midwest and was planning to work in Charlotte. He stopped for lunch in Greenville, walked through its famously renovated downtown, and decided this is where he wanted to stay.

Vimeo." data-reactid="150">The Iron Yard's CEO, via Vimeo.

here and here.)" data-reactid="154">Some other time I'll go into The Iron Yard's whole business model, which is a combination of "code academy," business incubators, kids' classes, and other features. The code academy charges $10,000 for a three-month session, and offers a full refund if graduates can't get an appropriate job. "We can guarantee an entry-level job, but entry level in this field might be $65,000 or $75,000," Barth told us. So far they have not had to give any refunds. (More here and here.)

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The point for today is an effect we heard about time and again. This was a change in this area's ability to attract and retain people like Barth or Dodds -- whom you might normally expect to find in Boulder, Portland, Boston, and who might have expected to find themselves there.

"Greenville is great once you get here, but it can be hard to get people to come and take a look," Peter Barth said.  Eric Dodds added, "It's been really interesting rubbing shoulders with people in our classes who say: 'I’ve gotten here, I’m going into your program, and this is my ticket Out.' Then after a while they say, 'I’ve seen this culture, I think I’m going to stay around here.' It’s been very interesting in stopping the brain drain."

dispersion of opportunity, in coming installments. And before this coming week's State of the Union address, a reminder that the resilient capacity of America is more evident and encouraging city-by-city than it seems in national discussions." data-reactid="173">More on this theme, the dispersion of opportunity, in coming installments. And before this coming week's State of the Union address, a reminder that the resilient capacity of America is more evident and encouraging city-by-city than it seems in national discussions.

As a closing bonus, in case you were wondering what the Blue Ridge Parkway looks like from above during the Polar Vortex era, here is your answer.

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