Which Way Do YOU Think The Dancer Is Spinning?

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com 19:34 20 Dec 2016, updated 07:37 21 Dec 2016

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  • The spinning dancer has been used to test which side of the brain is dominate

  • And if people saw the dancer switch directions, they were deemed geniuses

  • However, experts reveal that most people see her spinning clockwise

  • This is because we tend to have viewpoint from above

     

  • Another reason is we have attentional bias towards the right side of the body

At first glance, it's a simple video of a dancer spinning.

However, in fact it is an optical illusion that some say could actually reveal how smart you are.

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It plays with the brain's visual perception - some see her spinning clockwise, counterclockwise or even switching between the two. 

Scroll down for videos 

SPINNING DANCER 

The optical illusion was created by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in 2003 and for many years, was used to determine whether people are right-brain (creative) or left-brain (logical) dominant.

However, recent studies reveal that it does not deal with areas of the brain, but our perspective.

Most people see her spinning clockwise because we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below.

 Another reason for our clockwise bias is an attentional bias that leans towards the right side of the body.

 There is also a trick to see her switch between directions.

'Cover up everything but her foot touching the ground,' said Arthur Shapiro, a computer science professor at American University.

Stay focused on the foot and the shadow beneath her as she spins.

'Now imagine you are physically moving up or down in space.' 

When you imagine yourself below the dancer she should spin counterclockwise and clockwise if you envision yourself above her. 

For years, the rotating figure was used to test intelligence and determine which side of the brain was more dominate. 

Now, experts say it isn't about brain hemispheres, but most will see the dancer rotate clockwise because we tend to have a viewpoint from above

 and an attentional bias towards the right side of the body.

The optical illusion was created by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in 2003 and for many years, was used to determine whether people are right-brain (creative) or left-brain (logical) dominant.

And apparently, people with high IQs can see the figure spinning in both directions.

Paul Spencer with Tonic contacted Arthur Shapiro and Niko Troje, a pair of scientists who dissect Kayahara's spinning girl in the forthcoming Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions, to understand the truth behind this theory.

'That's just gibberish,' Shapiro, a computer science professor at American University in Washington D.C. and creator of the color wagon wheel illusion, told Spencer.

He explains that there is are much more complex reasons behind why we see her spinning in different directions.

The duo explains that this ballerina is deemed a reversible image in the class of optical illusions, meaning, even though she spins, she displays 'similarities to other static illusions' – like the Necker cube.

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Just like the spinning dancer, the Necker cube can be viewed in two ways: either the lower right panel is in the front or people see it placed in the back.

Reversible images like the cube and dancer change at a moment's notice because they can be viewed in more than one way, explained Troje, director for BioMotion Lab at Queens University.

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And the reason for the uncertainty is because these kinds of optical illusions do not reveal any clues about the image's depth to help us make sense of it.

When images aren't clear, your brain takes the initiative to fill in the gaps where information is missing.

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The dancer is reversible image in the class of optical illusions, meaning, even though she spins, she displays 'similarities to other static illusions' like the Necker cube (pictured), which can be viewed in two ways: the lower right panel is in the front or it placed in the back

However, a second video adds small white contour lines in certain areas of the dancer's body, which allows our brain to 'solve the illusion faster', said Shapiro.

This is because your brain is able to gather more information from what is being presented.

Shapiro also reveals that you don't have to be a genius to see the dancer switch directins.

'Cover up everything but her foot touching the ground,' he said.

Stay focused on the foot and the shadow beneath her as she spins.

'Now imagine you are physically moving up or down in space.'

'If you want her to switch directions, look at her as if you're filming her from below.

'Now pretend to be filming her from above.'

When you imagine yourself below the dancer she should spin counterclockwise and clockwise if you envision yourself above her.

A 2010 study reveals that most people will see the figure spin around clockwise, as we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below, reports BrainDecoder.

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Experts reveal that it isn't about brain hemispheres, but most will see the dancer spin clockwise because we tend to choose point of view from above and have an attentional bias towards the right side of the body

SOLVE THE 'IMPOSSIBLE ROOF' 

Kokichi Sugihara is famous for building 3D optical illusions that make viewers question the laws of nature, but are then blown away once the structure's true form is revealed.

However, even after the hoax is revealed, viewers still see the same illusion after the structure is back in its mystical position.

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After studying different shapes, Sugihara realized that our brain will choose the most rectangular configuration when it attempts to decipher features that have different interpretations, reports New Scientists.

He says our brains tend to interpret objects as symmetrical and it is just complete reality that facilitates the deception.

The reason our brains are easily fooled is because images do not share its depth, which leaves our brains to fill in the missing pieces.

And a study from 2015 says that the viewing-from-above factor is only the tip of the iceberg.

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The paper suggests another reason for our clockwise bias, which is an attentional bias - humans tend to lean towards the right side of the body, researchers explain.

And Shapiro and Troje tell Tonic that the reason most people see the dancer spinning clockwise also has to do with the area of our brain that deals with fear, rage and panic – the subcortical system.

Most things that can harm us are more likely to sit on the ground, such as snakes and spiders, explained Troje.

So when shown ambiguous visual information, we have tendency to process the image as if they're looking downward. 

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Source : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4052708/amp/Which-way-think-dancer-spinning-Researchers-explain-latest-hit-optical-illusion-genius.html

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